4 Major Considerations When Planning Your Next Hot Water System Purchase

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Google+2Pin on Pinterest0

If truth be told, the only time we ever think about our hot water systems is when it’s not working or when it starts to cost us a fortune in monthly water heating bills! Like a devout servant, they continue to fulfill our homes’ hot water needs without putting up any exceptional hot water plumbing and maintenance demands, until they are too old to perform at all.

However, as a general rule, if your system has lasted for more than 12 years, you should go for new hot water installation rather than hot water repair.

Having responded to hundreds of requests for hot water systems plumbing in Sydney, here are some of the most important considerations home owners should make when planning to install a hot water system or replacing an old system with a new one.

1.Size Of Your Hot Water System

From how many people live in the house to what does their daily routine look like and how many appliances do you have, there are plenty of considerations when determining what size of hot water system is best for your home.

Do you have dishwashers and washing machines and you use both of these appliances at the same time? Do you have family members that like to soak in a bath? How many taps require hot water supply simultaneously?  Make sure to ask yourself these questions before settling on which size to buy!

2.Electric, Gas Or Solar Hot Water System?

With hot water heaters making up to 20% of our home’s energy bills, which system offers the lowest running cost is a consideration worth your time and money.

Electric hot water heaters are generally easier and cheaper to install but have the highest running costs as compared to other options. If you have piped natural gas available, gas hot water systems can be a low-cost option for your home. On the other hand, solar hot water systems are quickly becoming more common place with Sydney homeowners with government rebates to off-set the high installation costs that accompanies them.

3.Storage Or Continuous Flow Hot Water Systems?

Most households in Sydney install hot water systems with storage units because that’s what they previously had and they can’t find a reason not to go with it again.

Storage hot water heaters work well when used during low tariff hours and are cheaper to install, however they take more time to heat up the entire tank and can be costly to operate as you risk wasting energy by not utilising all the water that is heated.

Continuous flow, on the other hand, ensures you never runs out of water, takes up less space and provides instantaneous hot water. Unlike storage tanks, continuous-flow hot water systems don’t waste energy and can be lighter on your pocket.

4.Energy Star Rating On Your Hot Water System

In order to maximise the efficiency of your hot water system, keep your energy bills low and ensure your household has sufficient hot water whenever needed, you need to check the energy star rating on your system before finalising your purchase.

The more the stars, the more energy efficient your system will be. The number of stars not only indicate how good it is for the environment but also how much money you can save in running costs over time. For new homes, it’s mandatory to install hot water systems with energy rating of 5 or more stars.

Conclusion

Irrespective of which hot water system you choose to replace with your existing one, water usage, the energy its run on, heating principle and energy star rating remains top considerations for home owners in Sydney.

If you are also looking for a specialist dealing in hot water systems plumbing in Sydney, we can help replace or install hot water systems in an affordable and timely manner. We service Parramatta, Hills District, North Shore, Northern Beaches, Inner West and surrounding suburbs.

Call us for an obligation-free quote at 1300 663 468.

Share on Facebook0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Google+2Pin on Pinterest0

No Comments Yet.

Leave a comment